Book Review

Fairy Compass

Fairy Compass

Fairy Senses #2

Emily Martha Sorensen, Apr 2016

63 pages, ebook, paperback

Middle grade fantasy

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

I purchased this book at the current price. This is my honest review for which I am not being compensated in any way.

The cover is simple and attractive as are the others in this series. The story is very readable alone or together. It’s all girls again, so I would think it would appeal to girls more than boys, but the concept could appeal to either. The characters are well-done. The main character is, of course, the most in-depth character. The pace is nice and steady and the tension builds slowly with the story. It’s a very nice addition to this wonderful series.

Here be the reveal…

In the first book, Cassie found glasses that allowed her to see fairies. Once she was aware of the fairies and promised to stay aware and mindful of the fairies, she no longer needed the glasses. So what does a compass have to do with seeing fairies?

Daisy is at the mall with Dad and her two sisters and finds the compass. She doesn’t understand what a compass is or how it works, but she tucks it in her pocket after noticing blue smudges around the food court as they are leaving. These must be fairies. The fairies had left this just for her, just like they did Carrie’s glasses! She gets together with Carrie to share her news and see if Carrie can help her figure out how this compass should work. Unfortunately, Carrie doesn’t understand compasses either. But she’s excited for Daisy. Together they discover some things about Daisy’s abilities, though. Daisy can apparently see through walls! And she can only see them with her right eye, but not in the dark. Apparently what she’s seeing is the fairies’ magnetic fields rather than the fairies themselves.

Daisy asks her father about compasses and how they work. Using his camping compass, he shows her how one works that really works to show direction. But Daisy’s compass doesn’t work quite that way. Daisy’s compass doesn’t point north. Daisy tries to explain that it’s a fairy compass. This rather upsets her parents, especially her mother, and they take her compass away from her. Daisy calls Carrie and her parents to get some support, and they come to the house to talk about the situation. Carrie’s parents try to convince Daisy’s parents to allow Daisy to use her compass, to trust her with it. But Daisy’s mother isn’t budging and won’t give it back. As they are leaving, Carrie’s Mom tells Daisy to try using the magic words that Moms love to hear. And Daisy asks what those are. She replies, “What can I do to help?” And Daisy is sure things will never get so bad that she will say those words. She hates to help around the house.

But with her baby sister being who and how she is, things reach that point sooner than she thinks. And she finds herself asking “What can I do to help?” She even gets her sister, Aneeka to help, too. Of course, Aneeka claims credit for the whole idea when Mom comes home and is pleased to find the livingroom vacuumed and the kitchen cleaned up by the two girls.

To reward Daisy, Mom and Dad agree to follow her compass to find out where it points. It’s getting dark when they finally find the spot and uncover a large silver medal. The compass WHOOSHES into the medal leaving an outline of hands on the front that don’t move. Daisy thinks it’s absolutely perfect! But when they get back home that evening, Mom makes Daisy hand over the medal for safe-keeping. She tells Cassie in school the next day that that’s okay, because the medal actually keeps the fairies away. Without it, the fairies are attracted to her and she sees them all the time!

Book #3 Fairy Earmuffs

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